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Fig. 2 | Biology Direct

Fig. 2

From: Biochemical and biophysical characterization of cell-free synthesized Rift Valley fever virus nucleoprotein capsids enables in vitro screening to identify novel antivirals

Fig. 2

Partial and full conversion of intermediate capsid structures into highly ordered capsids by nonradioactive CFPS-products. a Schematic illustration of the chase experiments. b Glycerol-gradient fractionation profiles of the radioactive material generated by CFPS under conditions favoring intermediate-assembly structures and “chased” by addition of the intermediate-assembly structures of nonradioactive products. As indicated: dark blue, “mock” chase experiment (addition of buffer only); green, “chase” experiment (addition of nonradioactive intermediate structures). The chase was performed for 120 min at 37 °C. c Glycerol-gradient fractionation profiles of the radioactive material generated by CFPS “chased” by the addition of nonradioactive products involving N-terminal or C-terminal deleted NP forms. Red, reaction initiated with full-length NP forms and chased with nonradioactive full-length forms (similar to panel B); light blue, reactions initiated with full-length forms and “chased” with N-terminal deleted NP; red, reactions initiated with full-length forms and “chased” with C-terminal deleted NP; purple, reactions initiated and chased with N-terminal deleted forms; yellow, reactions initiated and chased with C-terminal deleted forms

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